Home > Leisure and Pleasure > Keeping Fit in Retirement

Keeping Fit in Retirement

By: Jeff Durham - Updated: 8 Feb 2013 | comments*Discuss
 
Keeping Fit In Retirement Staying Active

Maintaining an active physical lifestyle in addition to eating a nutritious balanced diet is something which we are all encouraged to do and this tends to become even more important the older we get. As we reach retirement age and enter our later years regular exercise keeps our body in good shape and our minds active.

Why is it Necessary to Take Regular Exercise After I Retire?

Many retirees are often grateful to be out of the routine which encompasses the world of work. So much so that they neglect to have any kind of routine once they retire and often find themselves stuck in front of the TV, slumped in a chair reading a book or newspaper or, at best, pottering about in the garden.

However, the danger is that if you don’t do anything to introduce more exercise into your weekly routine, you’re far more at risk of suffering from obesity, diabetes and heart disease and an almost purely sedentary lifestyle can lead to things like high blood pressure, osteoporosis and colon cancer and can also bring on symptoms of anxiety and depression.

Do I Need to Follow an Exercise Regime?

It’s not necessary to be regimented in your approach to keeping fit when you’re older but you should try to build some exercise into your routine for, perhaps, half an hour a day on 3 or 4 days each week. However, once you retire it’s also important to know your limitations as it can be just as damaging if you overdo things or undertake sports activities which you aren’t physically fit for as it is to do no exercise at all. Injuries also take longer to recover from when you’re older. However, in general, whether it’s gentle aerobics or a ‘full-on’ intense game of tennis, regular exercise is very beneficial for your overall health, even when you’re older.

What Constitutes the Right Form of Exercise?

That will all depend on the kinds of activities you prefer and also the general state of your health. Some elderly people are, for example, still playing tennis and other intense stamina sapping sports well into their 70s and even beyond but the general rule of thumb is that the exercise you choose should benefit your heart and lungs. Medical experts suggest around 20 to 30 minutes of exercise three times per week which raises your pulse rate and gets you breathing faster is appropriate. So, to all of you gardeners out there, whilst tending your garden can be a great way to spend your free time, it doesn’t really constitute exercise as such, unless you’re involved with intense digging or chopping down trees on a regular basis.

Swimming, a gym workout, jogging, cycling and even walking, as long as it’s brisk and gets your heart beating faster, are all ideal forms of exercise but, if you haven’t undertaken any exercise for quite some time and/or you’re unsure as to your overall fitness and general health, you should discuss matters with your GP firstly who will be able to advise you of what kinds of exercise you should and shouldn’t do.

Even if you haven’t taken exercise seriously before, it’s never too late to start providing you’re in reasonable shape. You’ll often find that, contrary to your belief that you’ll be worn out, your energy levels will increase as a result and it will give you a new lease of life, once you’ve been exercising regularly for a few weeks.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
Why not be the first to leave a comment for discussion, ask for advice or share your story...

If you'd like to ask a question one of our experts (workload permitting) or a helpful reader hopefully can help you... We also love comments and interesting stories

Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Topics
Latest Comments
  • Woodsie
    Re: Clubs to Join in Retirement
    Hello I am 66 male and since retiring to be full-time carer I find I am becoming unfit as doing a lot of sitting about inbetween…
    16 September 2017
  • RetirementExpert
    Re: Learning for Free in Retirement
    Orangekipper - Your Question:I will be reaching retirement age (65) next year (29/7/1953).Early on in my adult life I had…
    12 September 2017
  • Orangekipper
    Re: Learning for Free in Retirement
    I will be reaching retirement age (65) next year (29/7/1953). Early on in my adult life I had dearly wanted to take a degree…
    11 September 2017
  • Emilina
    Re: Clubs to Join in Retirement
    Would like to no if any ladies out there would like to make new friends i am a very young 71 year old and would like to meet people…
    5 September 2017
  • LesleyM
    Re: Looking After a Pet in Retirement
    I live 4 miles north of Scarborough, North Yorkshire and have two parrots. Following s recent change in circumstances, I…
    5 September 2017
  • Nev
    Re: Popular Locations When Retiring Abroad
    Hello Everyone. I have lived permanently in France since year 2000. I had worked in England from age 15 years…
    5 August 2017
  • RetirementExpert
    Re: Clubs to Join in Retirement
    Kent - Your Question:Hi to all. I'm 70, female and divorced and live in the Swanley area. I have two small dogs and walk miles with…
    2 August 2017
  • Kent
    Re: Clubs to Join in Retirement
    Hi to all. I'm 70, female and divorced and live in the Swanley area. I have two small dogs and walk miles with them every week. I…
    31 July 2017
  • Stevie
    Re: Making Extra Cash Without Working
    Hi I have recently retired and I'm trying to find some kind of woodwork course in the Liverpool area that's not going to…
    28 July 2017
  • Rio
    Re: Clubs to Join in Retirement
    I live in Knowsley, Merseyside, there is no clubs for over 60s here. Only knitting, and the gyms. Would like to meet some new…
    22 July 2017
Further Reading...
Our Most Popular...
Add to my Yahoo!
Add to Google
Stumble this
Add to Twitter
Add To Facebook
RSS feed
You should seek independent professional advice before acting upon any information on the RetirementExpert website. Please read our Disclaimer.